The Latest

Jan 19, 2014 / 179 notes

Oh Lord, Oh Lord, what have I done?
I’ve fallen in love with a man on the run…

Don’t care if he’s guilty, don’t care if he’s not
He’s good and he’s bad and he’s all that I’ve got…

(via rolltheboness)

Jan 19, 2014 / 131,142 notes

thegreenguitar:

drtanner:

ravenhallow:

WHAT RHINOS SOUND LIKE

CRYING

PERFECT SWEET BABIES

I love showing this video to people because no one knows what rhinos actually sound like

THEY’RE SO CONVERSATIONAL.

Rhinos sound just like the sound I make when I’m listening to the sounds rhinos make

(via giarose)

Jan 19, 2014 / 1,099 notes
Thank you to @bradmeltzer and @chriseliopoulos! Moments like this are why I love my job! YOU guys are heroes! #ordinarypeoplechangetheworld
Jan 16, 2014

Thank you to @bradmeltzer and @chriseliopoulos! Moments like this are why I love my job! YOU guys are heroes! #ordinarypeoplechangetheworld

Jan 15, 2014 / 29,886 notes

sashasmilelalala:

Paul Rudd

(via giarose)

Jan 15, 2014 / 62,545 notes

Emma Thompson probably has an easy answer to all your existential questions.

My hero.

(via giarose)

Jan 15, 2014 / 86,291 notes

queennubian:

prochoiceamerica:

Today, the U.S. Supreme Court is hearing a challenge to a buffer zone law that protects patients and staff at clinics in Massachusetts from anti-choice harassment and violence.

Across the country, extreme, often violent, anti-choice protesters physically block access to clinics and intimidate people exercising their constitutionally protected rights.  Learn more about this issue and the laws that exist to protect patients and their doctors.

(via mylifeaskass)

Jan 13, 2014 / 36,537 notes
Jan 13, 2014 / 604,456 notes

(via thefrogman)

Jan 11, 2014 / 143,208 notes

there are always 3 types of sims gamers:

  • benevolent god: okay i'm gonna set everything up really nice and make sure everyone is comfortable and then i'll zoom right in and watch carefully oops is your hunger bar getting low don't worry shh i have that taken care of i have a cheat shhh it's okay keep painting that weird purple thing i love you
  • distant god: i'll set your life in motion but then i'm gonna pull back and let you do your thing maybe i'll wander the town a bit i'm sure you'll be fine
  • Loki: OOPS WHERE'D THAT DOOR GO I GUESS YOU'RE TRAPPED AND OH NO DID THE POOL LADDER DISAPPEAR I WONDER HOW LONG YOU CAN SWIM FOR HAHAHAHA FUCK YOU MORTAL
  • I used to be a benevolent god for ages, but since I started a more story-based game approach, I've moved to distant god, bordering on trickster god who enjoys soap operas way too damn much.
Jan 11, 2014 / 89,034 notes

(via poetfire)

I’m an avid reader of book reviews - not just online, but in print. Over the last few years, I’ve noticed a dearth of reviews written about women’s literature by major publications. Turns out that I wasn’t the only one who noticed; in 2012, VIDA tracked gender bias in book review sections of major magazines and newspapers. Theresults were chilling - at the New York Review of Books, men made up 84 percent of the reviewers and authored 83 percent of the books reviewed. Only 13 out of 62 reviewers at the New Republic were women, and only 14.5 percent of the books reviewed were written by women.



Even just as a book blogger, I noticed that many of the pitch letters I have been sent were for books written by men. Does this mean that men are better at requesting publicity? Or that, as Ruth Franklin argues, women are simply being published less (also alarming)? What scares me most is that this is an issue that hasn’t seen much progress since the late 90’s, when Francine Prose wrote a groundbreaking article for Harper’s Bazaar discussing whether female writers are inferior.
I don’t expect women’s literature to be reviewed on a 50/50 basis with books written by men - but the disparity is simply too high to be conscionable. Are publishers to blame for literary gender discrimination? Or is the gap demonstrative of larger literary trends, unrelated to bias?
Reading these articles have made me determined to take part in reviewing women’s literature more prolifically. Not just “chick lit” or YA - but contemporary, strongly intellectual fiction that just happens to be written by women. 

That’s why I will only be reviewing books written by women this year - and not just white cis women, either. I will be reading books by women of color, LGBT women, older women. I will be reading poetry by young girls and histories by female doctorates. Self-published women and women who have been actively publishing by major houses for years. Mostly, I just want to diversify the literature reviewed on this blog and put my writing where my mouth is. 

tl;dr: I encourage my fellow bloggers - both male and female - to take part in my 2014 Women’s Lit Challenge. The one, very simple rule:

You must only review books written by women. If you would like to narrow it down still farther to a smaller category, such as women of color or LGBT, then that is absolutely fine. There is no restriction on books read, merely books reviewed. If you have a book blog, you must post at least one review a month. You can participate for 3 months, 6 months, or an entire year if you’re really daring!
To find out more about the challenge, check out my post.
Jan 8, 2014
I’m an avid reader of book reviews - not just online, but in print. Over the last few years, I’ve noticed a dearth of reviews written about women’s literature by major publications. Turns out that I wasn’t the only one who noticed; in 2012, VIDA tracked gender bias in book review sections of major magazines and newspapers. Theresults were chilling - at the New York Review of Books, men made up 84 percent of the reviewers and authored 83 percent of the books reviewed. Only 13 out of 62 reviewers at the New Republic were women, and only 14.5 percent of the books reviewed were written by women.
Even just as a book blogger, I noticed that many of the pitch letters I have been sent were for books written by men. Does this mean that men are better at requesting publicity? Or that, as Ruth Franklin argues, women are simply being published less (also alarming)? What scares me most is that this is an issue that hasn’t seen much progress since the late 90’s, when Francine Prose wrote a groundbreaking article for Harper’s Bazaar discussing whether female writers are inferior.

I don’t expect women’s literature to be reviewed on a 50/50 basis with books written by men - but the disparity is simply too high to be conscionable. Are publishers to blame for literary gender discrimination? Or is the gap demonstrative of larger literary trends, unrelated to bias?

Reading these articles have made me determined to take part in reviewing women’s literature more prolifically. Not just “chick lit” or YA - but contemporary, strongly intellectual fiction that just happens to be written by women. 
That’s why I will only be reviewing books written by women this year - and not just white cis women, either. I will be reading books by women of color, LGBT women, older women. I will be reading poetry by young girls and histories by female doctorates. Self-published women and women who have been actively publishing by major houses for years. Mostly, I just want to diversify the literature reviewed on this blog and put my writing where my mouth is. 
tl;dr: I encourage my fellow bloggers - both male and female - to take part in my 2014 Women’s Lit Challenge. The one, very simple rule:
  • You must only review books written by women. If you would like to narrow it down still farther to a smaller category, such as women of color or LGBT, then that is absolutely fine. There is no restriction on books read, merely books reviewed. If you have a book blog, you must post at least one review a month. You can participate for 3 months, 6 months, or an entire year if you’re really daring!
To find out more about the challenge, check out my post.
2014 #goals because I’m a crazy person. Let’s see how many of these I knock off the list this year! Already working on the first.
Jan 8, 2014

2014 #goals because I’m a crazy person. Let’s see how many of these I knock off the list this year! Already working on the first.

Jan 5, 2014 / 8,070 notes

callingoutbigotry:

youngblackandvegan:

be-a-riot-grrrl:

frickyeahfeminism:

"Do you think rape is funny?

Playboy, Penthouse and Hustler do.”

This is rape culture

Source: oneangrygirl

jesus fucking christ

disgusting

don’t you EVER tell me that porn and porn companies (even ostensibly softcore ones like playboy) aren’t 100% complicit in and profiting from rape and rape culture

(via arguingvitality)

lesbeehive:

Les Beehive – ‘She Entwined’ by Audrey Kawasaki
Jan 5, 2014 / 2,612 notes